So if you have not heard already, Ted Cruz has declared that he is running for President of the United States of America (sans the pseudo Exploratory Committees. Good for him!).

The senator has even set up an official campaign site upon TedCruz.org (due to TedCruz.com being owned by a pro amnesty Obama fan).

Note: Ted Cruz can legally obtain TedCruz.com away from it’s current owner due to the 1999 Anti-Cyber Squatting Law (which both Hillary Clinton and Madonna used to acquire their respective domains from previous owners).

But the question that ironically is being ignored by news networks (but debated upon Twitter) is: Can a Canadian born politician legally be elected President of the United States‽

Supporters claim Ted Cruz is “natural born” due to the fact that he was:

  • never “naturalized” in the US
  • born to a mother with American citizenship (negated by the fact that his Dad had Cuban citizenship)
  • Has renounced his Canadian citizenship (an odd action for a “natural born” citizen

The “never naturalized” argument is a valid point, however many pro Cruz pundits miss this important fact regarding the “natural born” issue.

So why is there even a debate about a Cruz candidacy? Two significant factors that allow for some doubt are the facts that constitutional convention didn’t discuss the exact meaning of the words “natural born citizen” and the Supreme Court has never ruled on that issue.

“For Senator Cruz—who was born in Calgary, Alberta, to an American mother and a Cuban father—the question is more complicated,” Duggin said back in October 2013. “There is a strong argument that anyone who acquires United States citizenship at birth, whether by virtue of the 14th Amendment or by operation of federal statute, qualifies as natural born. The Supreme Court, however, has never ruled on the meaning of the natural-born citizenship requirement. In the absence of a definitive Supreme Court ruling—or a constitutional amendment—the parameters of the clause remain uncertain.” (via National Constitution Center

As Ted Cruz registers to run for President in various states, he will probably face various litigation across the country from folks challenging Cruz’s Presidential aspirations.

This will provide politico entertainment fodder which will (over the long term) diminish Ted Cruz’s chances of winning enough GOP primaries, let alone the general election in 2016.

While lower federal courts may or may not rule in Cruz’s favor, it’s doubtful the Supreme Court of the United States will rule in his favor (as Ted Cruz does not have many friends in the highest court of the land).

Hat tip: Lane Brooks